A man has been sentenced for sexual offences against children online and impersonating a police officer | Norfolk Constabulary

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A man has been sentenced for sexual offences against children online and impersonating a police officer

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A man in his 20s has been sentenced to more than two years imprisonment for a series of sexual offences including contacting children online as well as fraud - impersonating a police officer to try to gain his job back as a care assistant and a voluntary role.

Jordan Ellis, 27, of Lawson Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk, a former care assistant at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and St John Ambulance volunteer, appeared at Norwich Crown Court today (19 November 2021) after pleading guilty at a previous hearing.

He was sentenced to a total of two years and eight months for three counts of attempting to incite three separate children aged under 13 to engage in sexual activity, sending images of his body parts, two counts of attempting sexual communication with a child with two children he believed were 14 and 15 respectively, attempting to incite a child in sexual activity he believed to be a 15-year-old girl, making indecent images of children and distribution.

He was also ordered to serve two months in prison for two counts for fraud to be taken into consideration and received a 10-year Sexual Harm Prevention Order. The devices found to contain illegal material were forfeited for destruction.

After Norfolk Constabulary received intelligence Ellis had downloaded inappropriate images, a warrant was carried out at his home address on 17 June 2019.

Following an investigation by police, they were able to gain access to a downloading platform he had used and deleted chat from a free instant messaging service. The messaging service provides a level of anonymity which appeals to the teenage demographic because of its emphasis on privacy.  It is known to be used by paedophiles. Work carried out by the Digital Forensics Unit (DFU) to retrieve deleted data from the chats on his personal laptop provided further evidence he was talking to online profiles that stated they were children.

Six chats of a sexual nature with children under the age of 16 have been retrieved from this laptop via the platform as well as a chat which appears to be an adult exchanging images and the ages of children they are interested in.  The chats include pictures of Ellis. Evidence pointed to the chats being carried out via mobile phone and backed up on the laptop.

During the investigation, Ellis was suspended from his job as a health care assistant for the NHS and from his voluntary work for St John Ambulance. However, he then sent an email to both organisations in November 2019 attaching a letter purporting to be from DC Nunn, an officer working on the investigation, to say no further action was to be taken against him. He did not return to work or volunteering as both organisations felt the letter was suspicious. Officers subsequently arrested Ellis on 4 December on suspicion of fraud by false presentation and impersonating a police officer after the details were passed to police. Ellis was dismissed following a disciplinary process at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and from his voluntary post.

DC Amy Nunn said: “This has been a complicated job with Ellis taking many steps to try and hide his offending.  However, the hard and diligent work of the Safeguarding Children On-Line Team and the Digital Forensics Unit led to a late guilty plea ensuring this case has been dealt with more efficiently for the victims involved, negating the need for a trial.  The predatory nature of this individual has been exposed and the risk he poses to children can now be managed.”

St John Ambulance confirmed Ellis was suspended as a volunteer upon his arrest and dismissed when he pleaded guilty to his crimes. A spokesperson for the charity added: "We are appalled by Jordan Ellis’s crimes and our thoughts go out to anyone who has been affected.

"St John Ambulance takes the safety and welfare of everyone in our care extremely seriously, and we have strict policies in place to ensure the protection of our young people.”