Community Speed Watch | Norfolk Constabulary

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Community Speed Watch

Norfolk Police are committed to achieving casualty reduction targets and reducing the number of people killed and seriously injured on our roads. The Police aim to provide the right level of reassurance and enforcement checks in every community that wants them on a regular basis.  However, Officers cannot carry out speed enforcement checks in every community that would like to request one.

The Community Speed watch programme empowers communities to play an active role alongside the Safety Camera Partnership in tackling the problems of speeding in their neighbourhood.

As part of the Community Speed watch programme, trained volunteers verify and record the registration number of vehicles seen to breaking the speed limit.

These details are forwarded to the Safety Camera Partnership within 48 hours. A “warning letter” is then sent to the register owner of the vehicle, requesting them to keep their speed down.  If the vehicle is seen and recorded again a second and final letter will be sent. Persistent offenders may be targeted further.

Each district has a designated Community Engagement Officer (CEO) who can provide support and assistance.

Vehicles captured travelling at high speeds and registered in the county, will be reported to the CEOs for further action.

Want to volunteer?

To set up a scheme

  • You must have a minimum of 6 volunteers.
  • All the volunteers must be over 18 years old.
  • Each scheme must have a Co-ordinator (who will be the point of contact for the team) and where possible a Deputy.
  • The Parish (or local) Council support the scheme.
  • You will have to sign a CSW agreement and be vetted.
  • Equipment will be provided by the Constabulary
  • Training will be provided on using the equipment and on Health and Safety issues.
  • Volunteers will be covered by the Constabulary’s insurance.
  • Locations chosen will assessed by the Constabulary.

If you would like to set up a Community Speed Watch scheme or for further information on CSW by email at [email protected]

Have you received a letter?

There will be no further action against you if this is your first letter. If your vehicle is recorded again by this scheme as the registered owner you will receive a second and final letter. Your vehicle is caught again details will also be sent to your local CEO.

If your vehicle details will be retained on the system for 1 year.

If your vehicle was not in the vicinity at the time of the check please contact [email protected]

 

FAQ's for motorists

I have received a warning letter. Will I now be fined or taken to court?

No, for this specific incident we will be taking no further action. Our aim is to encourage people to slow down without having to involve any further action.

 

I have received a warning letter stating this is the second time my vehicle has been monitored speeding. What happens now?

This is your final warning, if you are monitored speeding again within the next 18 months your vehicle details will be passed to our Community Engagement Officers for further action. This could include the vehicle details being sent to Roads Policing or the Safer Neighbourhood Team for targeted intervention or a visit.

 

I have received a warning letter yet I wasn’t driving the vehicle. What do I do?

You should make the driver aware of the contents of the letter and any other material enclosed. Speed Watch monitors vehicles not drivers so it would be advisable to inform all users of the vehicle of the warning.

 

I have received a warning letter for an incident which occurred after I had sold the vehicle. What happens now?

You should contact the CSW Administrator and inform them of the change of keeper. We would also strongly advise you to contact the DVLA to make sure your details are removed from the data base.

 

At what speed do you send letters to the registered keepers?

Community Speed Watch only monitors roads with a 20mph, 30mph limit. We work to the same guidelines as Norfolk and Suffolk Constabularies in accordance with the NPCC Guidelines (National Police Chiefs Council) Within those guidelines the policy is to begin prosecution at 10% + 2mph i.e. 35mph in a 30mph area.

My vehicle wasn’t in the location stated on the warning letter.

There are a number of processes in place to verify the registration of the speeding vehicle. On the rare occasion a warning letter is sent out by mistake the details will be deleted from the database. To start this process, you will need to contact the CSW Administrator.

 

I no longer own this vehicle.

Please contact the DVLA as this vehicle was showing as being registered to you at the time we processed the letter. If you have recently updated them, this information can take some time to update therefore please ignore the letter.

 

Who are Community Speedwatch?

Community Speed Watch is a community operated initiative designed to allow volunteers to officially monitor and report to the Police details of speeding vehicles in areas of concern to the community. Community Speed Watch is not enforcement.


The Community Speed Watch initiative allows members of the community to address speeding issues by becoming actively involved in road safety, using speed detection equipment to monitor speeds from safe locations.

Whilst all of the road safety partners are working together to achieve casualty reduction targets and reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on our roads we cannot expect Police Officers to carry out enforcement checks in every community on a regular basis. This is where Community Speed Watch can help by working with the partnership.

Our aim is NOT to catch as many speeding drivers as possible but to raise awareness that excessive speeds are socially unacceptable. We aim to reduce speed in areas of concern and address issues from communities by raising awareness.

 

How does Community Speedwatch work?

Community Speed Watch volunteers monitor vehicles from designated sites which have been risk assessed and approved by the police. Our volunteers use a police approved hand-held speed detection device to check the speed of vehicles and any vehicles recorded driving 24+ mph in 20mph zone, 35+ mph in 30mph zone are written down on a monitoring sheet. The details recorded are time, date, site, make, model, colour, registration and speed.

These details are sent to the CSW Administrator for processing. A PNC (Police National Computer) check is run on the vehicle and the registered keeper’s information is obtained and a letter is sent.

First offence – Letter is sent to the registered keeper advising details of the offence and a reminder of the effects of their action
Second offence – Follow up letter is sent to registered keeper with stronger wording

Persistent offenders and High Speeders will be added to a tasking list and circulated for targeted police intervention

 

Why are you using members of the public to monitor speed?

Communities across the region want to be involved in the battle to reduce speeds and are happy to donate time. All police volunteers are vetted, trained, supported and insured. As members of the extended policing family they also have 100% backing from Norfolk and Suffolk Police. Should any police volunteer be abused or intimidated the offender will be dealt with according to criminal law.

 

Are volunteers checked?

Volunteers must be over 18 years of age and will be subject to a vetting procedure.

 

Are volunteers trained?

Volunteers are trained to use the equipment correctly, codes of conduct and Health and Safety issues. This knowledge is refreshed annually.

 

I have been monitored speeding. What happens to my details?

We only hold the details of the registered keeper on our secure police server. These details are held and accessed in line with the restrictions imposed by the Data Protection and Management of Police Information guidelines.

 

Do the volunteers have to follow any rules?

Yes, our volunteers must follow our rules of conduct. The safety of the volunteers and all road users is paramount.

  • Volunteers must not stand in the road at any time.

  • Volunteers must not obstruct the footpath.

  • Approved high-visibility jackets must be worn at all times.

  • Volunteers will only use approved equipment and will only use the equipment following final approval by the Constabulary.

  • Volunteers will only use the equipment at locations which have been agreed in advance by the Constabulary.

  • When traffic is being monitored, the signs provided will be placed and erected in accordance with the instructions given.

  • The device must be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

  • Volunteers must not attempt to conceal their speed monitoring activities from passing motorists.

  • Monitoring is to be undertaken by a minimum of three volunteers at any one time.

  • It is strongly recommended that at least one volunteer be in possession of a mobile phone.

  • Monitoring only should take place. NO signals or gestures are to be made to drivers. Volunteers MUST NOT

    attempt to stop any vehicle.

  • Checks should be carried out in daylight hours and in 20mph and 30mph speed limit areas only.

     

I have received a warning letter but it doesn’t say who monitored me. How can I find this out?

This information is kept secure in the interest of staff and volunteer safety and will not normally be disclosed. The information is available to supervisors should the need to investigate a complaint or incident arise. Speed Watch sessions are staffed by police officers, police community support officers and police volunteers or a mixture of all three.

 

I wish to complain about a member of a Speed Watch team.

Community Speed Watch operators have strict guidelines to adhere to and are expected to maintain a professional approach to monitoring. If you feel that this was not the case, then please contact the CSW Administrator and they will investigate your complaint.

 

For questions about Speed Watch in general contact our CSW Administrator at:

[email protected]

 

You may wish to contact your County Council Road Safety team who can discuss ways of helping you with other road safety issues in conjunction with Community Speedwatch.

www.norfolk.gov.uk/roads-and-transport/roads/road-safety  

Email: [email protected]

 

FAQ's for volunteers

Who are Community Speedwatch?

Community Speed Watch is a community operated initiative designed to allow volunteers to officially monitor and report to the Police details of speeding vehicles in areas of concern to the community. Community Speed Watch is not enforcement.

The Community Speed Watch initiative allows members of the community to address speeding issues by becoming actively involved in road safety, using speed detection equipment to monitor speeds from safe locations.

Whilst all of the road safety partners are working together to achieve casualty reduction targets and reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on our roads we cannot expect Police Officers to carry out enforcement checks in every community on a regular basis. This is where Community Speed Watch can help by working with the partnership.

Our aim is NOT to catch as many speeding drivers as possible but to raise awareness that excessive speeds are socially unacceptable. We aim to reduce speed in areas of concern and address issues from communities by raising awareness.

 

How does Community Speedwatch work?

Community Speed Watch volunteers monitor vehicles from designated sites which have been risk assessed and approved by the police. Our volunteers use a police approved hand-held speed detection device to check the speed of vehicles and any vehicles recorded driving 24+ mph in 20mph (Suffolk only)zone, 35+ mph in 30mph zone and 46+ mph in 40mph (Norfolk only) zone are written down on a monitoring sheet. The details recorded are time, date, site, make, model, colour, registration and speed.

These details are sent to the CSW Administrator for processing. A PNC (Police National Computer) check is run on the vehicle and the registered keeper’s information is obtained and a letter is sent.

First offence – Letter is sent to the registered keeper advising details of the offence and a reminder of the effects of their action

Second offence – Follow up letter is sent to registered keeper with stronger wording

Persistent offenders and High Speeders will be added to a tasking list and circulated for targeted police intervention

 

Why are you using members of the public to monitor speed?

Communities across the region want to be involved in the battle to reduce speeds and are happy to donate time. All police volunteers are vetted, trained, supported and insured. As members of the extended policing family they also have 100% backing from Norfolk Police.  Should any police volunteer be abused or intimidated the offender will be dealt with according to criminal law.

 

I have a speeding problem in my neighbourhood. What can I do?

If you and other members of the community think that speeding traffic has a dangerous or negative social impact on your area, then involve your local Parish Council as their support will be vital. If it appears that there are others who would like to volunteer to take an active role in speed monitoring, then forming a group is a good next step - maybe there are other small parish councils nearby with similar issues you could link into, making a geographical connection to a common purpose?

Contact your local Community Speed Watch at:

Norfolk: [email protected]

We will be able to guide you through the process, and will facilitate training, risk assessments, and liaison with your local Neighbourhood Policing Team.

 

Can I join a Community Speed Watch team for a day to see what it’s like?

Unfortunately, no, only properly inducted and trained police volunteers are able to carry out monitoring duties because of insurance issues. Your local policing team will be able to discuss the scheme with you or put you in touch with someone that can.

 

Are volunteers checked?

Volunteers must be over 18 years of age and will be subject to a vetting procedure.

 

Are volunteers trained?

Volunteers are trained to use the equipment correctly, codes of conduct and Health and Safety issues. This knowledge is refreshed annually.

 

How do you decide which sites to use?

Every Community Speed Watch location used for monitoring traffic will have been chosen by the community. Each site will then be risk assessed by the police, which will include the safe positioning for the signs used during monitoring sessions. Once evaluated and approved the police will issue a site code.

The personal safety of volunteers and motorists is a primary consideration. All sites will have been chosen to comply with the following conditions:

  • Safe for volunteers to operate at
  • Able to safely accommodate equipment, including safe positioning of CSW signs
  • Good visibility to motorists to maximise educational impact and reduce the risk of sudden reactions
  • Have a police issued site code

If these principles cannot be adhered to then a location is not suitable for deployment and will not be approved by Norfolk Community Speed Watch.

 

Do the volunteers have to follow any rules?

Yes, our volunteers must follow our rules of conduct. The safety of the volunteers and all road users is paramount.  

  • Volunteers must not stand in the road at any time.
  • Volunteers must not obstruct the footpath.
  • Approved high-visibility jackets must be worn at all times.
  • Volunteers will only use approved equipment and will only use the equipment following final approval by the Constabulary.
  • Volunteers will only use the equipment at locations which have been agreed in advance by the
  • When traffic is being monitored, the signs provided will be placed and erected in accordance with the instructions given.
  • The device must be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Volunteers must not attempt to conceal their speed monitoring activities from passing motorists.
  • Monitoring is to be undertaken by a minimum of three volunteers at any one time.
  • It is strongly recommended that at least one volunteer be in possession of a mobile phone.
  • Monitoring only should take place. NO signals or gestures are to be made to drivers. Volunteers MUST NOT attempt to stop any vehicle.
  • Checks should be carried out in daylight hours and in 30mph and 40mph speed limit areas only.

 

Volunteers and State Benefits

The latest advice from the department of Work and Pensions is that whilst you are a volunteer your benefits will not be affected.

It is compulsory for claimants to notify benefits advisers at the relevant agencies (job centre plus, the benefits agency, local council), if in receipt of housing benefit or council tax benefit) that they are volunteering.  

There is no duty on the part of the Constabulary to inform any agency that an individual is volunteering; it is entirely down to the volunteer. More information can be found in the Department for Work and Pensions leaflet “volunteering while getting benefits”.  More information can also be found on the direct gov website www.direct.gov.uk

 

Volunteering and Universal Credit.

You can still volunteer if you are claiming universal credit as long as you also undertake other activities, such as job searching, training or other requirements, identified by your Jobcentre Plus adviser. This is likely to be part of a claimant commitment.

CSW volunteers should inform their jobcentre plus advisors that they are volunteering.

www.nidirect.gov.uk